HOME
ARCHIVES
MUSIC REVIEWS
INDUSTRY NEWS
 
EVENTS CALENDAR
EVENT REVIEWS
STREAMS
DOWNLOADS
VIDEO
TOP TEN CHART
FLYER ARCHIVES
FREE EMAIL
CHAT
USER PROFILES
BULLETIN BOARDS
MATCHMAKER
PICTURE VOTING
CLASSIFIEDS
LOGO STORE
ARTISTS - DJ'S
BOOKING AGENTS
DESIGNERS
LIGHTING/VISUALS
MANAGEMENT
PROMOTERS
RECORD LABELS
VENDORS
MORE...
ADVERTISING
BANNER EXCHANGE
PARTNERS
CONTACT US
 
  Offworld Music
Record label catering to innovative music, artists and producers - from drum&bass to hip hop and electronic.

Apply here to become one of our partners.
 
 

 

 

  Jethro Senger (HEADSPACE) interview


 

 

 

 


  Underground Techno Man
  speaking his mind in Paris

 

 

 

 


  DJ Justyn Time's Tatoo
  music is my life

 

 

 

 

 

Clearly the greatest asset of the dance music community is the people. Whether it is a DJ, promoter, clubber, webcaster, broadcaster, or listener, they all bring something special to the entire collective. HEADSPACE is a documentary film project that aims to show that while differences in location, culture, and language may have small impacts on the scene, there are common threads that tie us all together. Jethro Senger, the director and creative force behind the project, has taken the challenge of traveling the world to attend various events from large festivals, such as the Detroit Electronic Music Festival, Delta Heavy Tour: Atlanta, and three years of the annual Winter Music Conference in Miami, Florida, to smaller intimate gatherings in an attempt to explore what drives our common musical addiction.

Senger is an independent filmmaker based in Orlando, Florida, who originally begun writing a dramatic script following a group of ravers, has completed his three years of travels that have taken him to several cities and countries including, Osaka, Japan, seven cities in Europe, Miami, Detroit, New York, Atlanta and Los Angeles. While Senger has compiled a substantial amount of footage himself, he has also asked that people around the world who are involved in the dance culture take part in the film by submitting original music, photos, and stories via the Headspace website (www.headspacemovie.com). Materials that are submitted through the website will be incorporated into the film while others materials will remain on the website as Senger says, ?The film and the website are aimed to exist side by side.?

Recently, Senger, who is currently in the process of editing a trailer for the film to be screened during the 2003 Winter Music Conference, took a break from editing the film to sit down and give us a brief overview of how the film is coming together:

What was the focus of the HEADSPACE project?

I wanted to get a feel for people around the world and show globally how people are dedicated to dance music. The variances in location. When you go to a different city, it?s still dance culture. But there?s a lot of little things that are different. The way people act, the way people dance, the way people talk about a DJ.

How did you figure out who you were going to talk to for the film? Was it people you knew? Friends of friends? People you met at events?

It's a little of all of that. A lot of this film, I'm realizing, is my own search. Questions that I have in me too. How important is this music? Why am I always thinking about it? Why am I always drawn to people that like to talk about DJs and clubs and everything? Just the whole thing. After all these years, why am I still interested in it? And that was, I guess, the one thing that sparked my original drive to make a film was that there's got to be more people out there that feel the same way I do. So what is it about the whole thing? And in traveling and talking to people, I hope to be able to present people?s feelings and people's stories through dance music. It?s definitely been a journey.

In editing the film, do you have any idea at this point of how you are going to bring across differences between the various scenes?

How to bring that across? Well, in each place that I?ve been, I've gotten a mixture of... It's like you asked before about how and who I got, I tried to get a good overall picture when I was in each place, while filming. I would find DJs, and promoters, and people just out. And I would hang out with them. And I would interview them. And we would plan to go to a night, and I would go do that with them. I would do little interviews on the way, then I would met somebody outside the club. I think all these "trails" of people in each location, I think through all of that you'll see, you know, the little things about the city. One of the things I've actually had problems with is just getting to some of the bigger names to interview. And I think it is just because has grown too much. The DJs are just too busy. They've got too many flights, they've got too many shows, they don't have time. So I used that to my advantage and started focusing on the journey of myself and the people I met, and the stories that had in their heads. Because they represent al of us. From the people that have been into the scene for a long time, all the way down to the young kids who are just starting to go out now. And how they are being influenced and all the little facets of what's happening at raves now, and how they?re being influenced legally. There's so much to it.

The do-it-yourself angle and receiving submissions makes this project appealing?

I actually had some people who were surprised I wanted to talk to them. They were like, "who am I? I'm nobody. I'm not a name. Why would you want to talk to me?" Then you start talking to them and they have a lot of stories, a lot of good points, they know a lot of DJs in their cities, they know a lot about what's happening. So I get all that. I have had a lot of cool stories sent to me, people have written poems, written pieces.

I read that early on an album cover had an impact on your making this film?

It was a Rabbit In The Moon remixes album that came out in 1999. It was just the jacket of it, folded open, and it's just a collage of photographs. All kinds of people, it's probably all of their friends. I recognized a couple of people in there that I had seen around. I just looked at all these people and I was like, they all have stories. Everyone has a story, everyone has certain opinions. But, it's kind of interesting. It's kind of important to see all of these people.

I want to thank Jethro Senger for taking the time to meet with me and discuss the film. If you want submit materials to Jethro, visit the Headspace website at www.headspacemovie.com to learn more.

-- written by Shawn Wallace

 

ace="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">   Jethro Senger (HEADSPACE) interview


 

 

 

 


  Underground Techno Man
  speaking his mind in Paris

 

 

 

 


  DJ Justyn Time's Tatoo
  music is my life

 

 

 

 

 

Clearly the greatest asset of the dance music community is the people. Whether it is a DJ, promoter, clubber, webcaster, broadcaster, or listener, they all bring something special to the entire collective. HEADSPACE is a documentary film project that aims to show that while differences in location, culture, and language may have small impacts on the scene, there are common threads that tie us all together. Jethro Senger, the director and creative force behind the project, has taken the challenge of traveling the world to attend various events from large festivals, such as the Detroit Electronic Music Festival, Delta Heavy Tour: Atlanta, and three years of the annual Winter Music Conference in Miami, Florida, to smaller intimate gatherings in an attempt to explore what drives our common musical addiction.

Senger is an independent filmmaker based in Orlando, Florida, who originally begun writing a dramatic script following a group of ravers, has completed his three years of travels that have taken him to several cities and countries including, Osaka, Japan, seven cities in Europe, Miami, Detroit, New York, Atlanta and Los Angeles. While Senger has compiled a substantial amount of footage himself, he has also asked that people around the world who are involved in the dance culture take part in the film by submitting original music, photos, and stories via the Headspace website (www.headspacemovie.com). Materials that are submitted through the website will be incorporated into the film while others materials will remain on the website as Senger says, ?The film and the website are aimed to exist side by side.?

Recently, Senger, who is currently in the process of editing a trailer for the film to be screened during the 2003 Winter Music Conference, took a break from editing the film to sit down and give us a brief overview of how the film is coming together:

What was the focus of the HEADSPACE project?

I wanted to get a feel for people around the world and show globally how people are dedicated to dance music. The variances in location. When you go to a different city, it?s still dance culture. But there?s a lot of little things that are different. The way people act, the way people dance, the way people talk about a DJ.

How did you figure out who you were going to talk to for the film? Was it people you knew? Friends of friends? People you met at events?

It's a little of all of that. A lot of this film, I'm realizing, is my own search. Questions that I have in me too. How important is this music? Why am I always thinking about it? Why am I always drawn to people that like to talk about DJs and clubs and everything? Just the whole thing. After all these years, why am I still interested in it? And that was, I guess, the one thing that sparked my original drive to make a film was that there's got to be more people out there that feel the same way I do. So what is it about the whole thing? And in traveling and talking to people, I hope to be able to present people?s feelings and people's stories through dance music. It?s definitely been a journey.

In editing the film, do you have any idea at this point of how you are going to bring across differences between the various scenes?

How to bring that across? Well, in each place that I?ve been, I've gotten a mixture of... It's like you asked before about how and who I got, I tried to get a good overall picture when I was in each place, while filming. I would find DJs, and promoters, and people just out. And I would hang out with them. And I would interview them. And we would plan to go to a night, and I would go do that with them. I would do little interviews on the way, then I would met somebody outside the club. I think all these "trails" of people in each location, I think through all of that you'll see, you know, the little things about the city. One of the things I've actually had problems with is just getting to some of the bigger names to interview. And I think it is just because has grown too much. The DJs are just too busy. They've got too many flights, they've got too many shows, they don't have time. So I used that to my advantage and started focusing on the journey of myself and the people I met, and the stories that had in their heads. Because they represent al of us. From the people that have been into the scene for a long time, all the way down to the young kids who are just starting to go out now. And how they are being influenced and all the little facets of what's happening at raves now, and how they?re being influenced legally. There's so much to it.

The do-it-yourself angle and receiving submissions makes this project appealing?

I actually had some people who were surprised I wanted to talk to them. They were like, "who am I? I'm nobody. I'm not a name. Why would you want to talk to me?" Then you start talking to them and they have a lot of stories, a lot of good points, they know a lot of DJs in their cities, they know a lot about what's happening. So I get all that. I have had a lot of cool stories sent to me, people have written poems, written pieces.

I read that early on an album cover had an impact on your making this film?

It was a Rabbit In The Moon remixes album that came out in 1999. It was just the jacket of it, folded open, and it's just a collage of photographs. All kinds of people, it's probably all of their friends. I recognized a couple of people in there that I had seen around. I just looked at all these people and I was like, they all have stories. Everyone has a story, everyone has certain opinions. But, it's kind of interesting. It's kind of important to see all of these people.

I want to thank Jethro Senger for taking the time to meet with me and discuss the film. If you want submit materials to Jethro, visit the Headspace website at www.headspacemovie.com to learn more.

-- written by Shawn Wallace

 

What did you think of this feature? We want to hear from you! Post your comments on the Raves.com Bulletin Board.

More features in the Archives


Jehtro conducting interviews in Detroit

 

more features in the archives and home



Rate this feature! Leave Comments!
You need to be logged in first. CLICK TO LOG IN HERE
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Add comment Average rating: 0 | Reviews: 0 | Top 10

  Home | Usage Policy | Privacy Policy