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  Offworld Music
Record label catering to innovative music, artists and producers - from drum&bass to hip hop and electronic.

Apply here to become one of our partners.
 
 

 

 

  Interview with Rebecca Sin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

booking info: bookings@dubcoast.com

management:
ws7 media
tel . 323.650.0974 bookings@wantickets.com

Name: Rebecca Sin
Born: July 2, 1980
Years spinning: 3
Music types:

tech/tribal house

Influences: Steve Lawler, Rabbit in the moon, Orbital, Deep Dish, old Underworld, Future Sound of London, Josh Wink, BT, Hybrid, Humate, Roni Size, Digweed, this list can go on forever.

What happens when you send a Dallas native to Emerson College in Boston, MA for 4 years? She becomes one of the top DJ/producers in the Northeast with a degree in Film Production. Rebecca Sin, now living in the Los Angeles area, has been voted "next Big Thing" by Wantickets.com and"Breakthrough DJ" by Wantmymusic.com.

Rebecca brings a fresh new sound of tribal, tech and progressive house/trance. Having first learned to DJ in January 2000, it didn't take long for people to realize that she had a natural touch. After DJing for only four months, Rebecca was given a residency at the Exchange nightclub in downtown Boston. Known as DJ Infinite throughout the New England area, she became a frequent in such places as Matrix, Metropolis, Roxy, SW1, and Tilt. When she was not working at the clubs, she could be heard on such shows as Radio Babylon or Revolutions (WERS 88.9fm). During the day, if you could not find her in the studio, that probably meant she was working at Sound Factory record store. By December 2001, she and Fabrik Nos (as Aluminum Theory) had already produced her first track on the Heavy Industries label (www.heavy-industries.com) called "Juice".

With her first track providing additional credibility to her potential, Rebecca decided the West Coast was where she would take her career to the next level. Rebecca moved to the Los Angeles area in January 2002. Since moving to LA, she has produced her second track as Aluminum Theory, called "Crunch". Having been played at local clubs in L.A. to her flawless set at the Clevelander Hotel Pool Party in South Beach (WMC 2002), her tracks and her performance are quickly gaining the attention of industry professionals.

In May 2002, Rebecca began working on a new project with long time friend and engineer, Adrian Ordonez. Although she has yet to release her first track from this project, there a two new tracks in the works. Their sound ranges from raw funky tribal to dark techy house/trance. When in Los Angeles, if Rebecca is not in the studio, then she can most likely be found playing at Spundae, Chemistry, or Silent Taco. If you can't find Rebecca in Los Angeles, it's probably because she is fulfilling her duties as Kleen resident in cities such as Portland, Oklahoma City, Asheville, Baltimore, Providence, and Myrtle Beach. If she is not at any of those places, then she is probably out enjoying the fact that she is only 22 years old.

Annalee: How did you get started?

Rebecca Sin: Fate.

What was the 1st record you ever bought?
Rabbit in the moon - Floorida.

What/Where was your 1st gig?
The Exchange Nightclub in downtown Boston.

Where can people find you DJing?
Spundae, Chemistry, CineSpace, anywhere Dubcoast goes!

How did you end up in good ol' Los Angeles?
I went to a film school, so everyone who graduated either went to New York or Los Angeles. I hate the cold weather so New York was not an option. I had never been to LA before, but everyone who visited came back and told me I would love it. I just kind of picked up and came here without knowing what to expect. Even though I donít plan on pursuing a career in film production, moving here was probably the best decision I have ever made.

Do you currently have any residencies?
Big DJ Little Club (used to be We love Tuesdays) in Santa Barbara

Do you currently have any albums out?
Not yet!

Are you in the studio now, do we have anything to look forward to in the near future, maybe some collaboration with someone else?
I have my collaboration with techno producer Steve Eagle called Aluminum Theory. We have completed 2 tracks, and he just relocated from Boston a couple of weeks ago so you can expect much more in the future.

What do you think about all this mainstream techno on the radio these days?
Do you think it is good for the scene or are you 100% against it selling out? That type of "pop-techno" has always been out there. I donít really mind it (as long as I don't have to listen to it) because it breaks the commercial crowd away from hip-hop. It gets them used to dancing without the bump'n'grind.

What type of music do you listen to when you are not spinning?
My CD player in my car was stolen about a week after I moved out here so there is never music in my car. At work I listen to new and upcoming record releases online. When I get home, I go into my room and listen to all my new records over and over again. I donít really feel that it is as important to practice spinning my new records as it is to listen to them. The more you listen to them, the better you will know what to do with them.

Have you ever worked on a Movie Soundtrack?
No. I spent 4 years in college working on films, so Iím trying to get away from that. My roommates have been working on one for a month now and I can tell it is driving them insane. I definitely wouldnít turn down an offer though since it would be great exposure. In fact, all the big producers are practically begging for a soundtrack right now.

What are your thoughts on the scene right now locally?
I think the local scene in LA is great. From what I have seen, a local can often bring more of a crowd than a big name. There is a ton of great local talent in this city like Oliver Twist, Cody Lee, John Wander, Kazell, John Do, Justin Gourley, Larry Kahm (and much more) Its great to see everyone working together. Promoters are starting to realize what they have right in front of them. No need for a flight or a hotel. Eric over at Circus just started a night called Spotlight that showcases up and coming talent in LA. If he can fill all 3 rooms over at Circus with only up-and-comers then that will be a sign that local talent has really taken over.

Do any favorite moments that come to mind? (If moment was during an old scene, do you think this could occur again in the future or is the scene too different now to allow that to happen?)
I was at a rave in a ghetto reggae club in Brooklyn. They shut the party down a couple of hours early because one of the bouncers got in a fight with Keoki. To make up for the early close, they gave everyone free pizza. There is nothing like watching hundreds of ravers leaving a rave at 7am eating a slice of pizza. This is not really my favorite moment, just the one that sticks out in my mind the most. It was a very weird, yet memorable evening. About halfway through the 3 hour drive back to Boston I realized that the girl who searched me at the door never gave me back my driverís license. When I went to fly back to Texas about a month later to get a new license they refused to let me on the plane without the license, even though that was the reason for the trip back home.

In the many places you have performed, which one is your most favorite?
Spundae. Always a great crowd and I love the Allen & Heath mixers at Circus.

How has your creativity changed over the last 10 years? Do you tend to stay with your own styles/ideas or do you allow the mainstream to influence you and your work?
The only way I think that mainstream influences me, is it tells me what NOT to do. I like to offer people something different. Over the past 10 years my creative focus has changed from advertising to graphic design to filmmaking to djing/producing. I am still utilizing some of my skills running the wantickets website, but my main creative focus is my djing.

What is your current Goal as a DJ?
My first goal in LA was to play for Spundae. Now my goal is to become the 1st female artist of Bullitt Bookings. I think I would someday make a perfect addition to their roster.

Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years?
I want to continue playing out regularly. Eventually I want to open a record store. I love listening to music and giving people records I know they will love. Itís also great to turn people on to different types and styles of music, stuff they wouldnít normally play. I would be perfectly happy running a record store during the day, and making music at night. I could probably do that for the rest of my life.

What would you be doing right now if you never bought that 1st record and became a DJ?
I would probably be working my way up in the film industry. Probably reading scripts and answering phones wondering if I would ever get to do what I wanted. I would not be spending all the money I make on records, but I would probably spend a lot of money going out every weekend burning off the frustration of a shitty job.

OK Last question and the cheesiest of all! What is the dopest thing about being a DJ?
Many people think a DJ should conform to the crowd, play what the crowd wants to hear. I love showing them NEW music. Giving them something that they have never heard before. A track sounds different the first time you hear it. I love showing people that new track.

-- written by Annalee Stone

 

ace="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">   Interview with Rebecca Sin

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

booking info: bookings@dubcoast.com

management:
ws7 media
tel . 323.650.0974 bookings@wantickets.com

Name: Rebecca Sin
Born: July 2, 1980
Years spinning: 3
Music types:

tech/tribal house

Influences: Steve Lawler, Rabbit in the moon, Orbital, Deep Dish, old Underworld, Future Sound of London, Josh Wink, BT, Hybrid, Humate, Roni Size, Digweed, this list can go on forever.

What happens when you send a Dallas native to Emerson College in Boston, MA for 4 years? She becomes one of the top DJ/producers in the Northeast with a degree in Film Production. Rebecca Sin, now living in the Los Angeles area, has been voted "next Big Thing" by Wantickets.com and"Breakthrough DJ" by Wantmymusic.com.

Rebecca brings a fresh new sound of tribal, tech and progressive house/trance. Having first learned to DJ in January 2000, it didn't take long for people to realize that she had a natural touch. After DJing for only four months, Rebecca was given a residency at the Exchange nightclub in downtown Boston. Known as DJ Infinite throughout the New England area, she became a frequent in such places as Matrix, Metropolis, Roxy, SW1, and Tilt. When she was not working at the clubs, she could be heard on such shows as Radio Babylon or Revolutions (WERS 88.9fm). During the day, if you could not find her in the studio, that probably meant she was working at Sound Factory record store. By December 2001, she and Fabrik Nos (as Aluminum Theory) had already produced her first track on the Heavy Industries label (www.heavy-industries.com) called "Juice".

With her first track providing additional credibility to her potential, Rebecca decided the West Coast was where she would take her career to the next level. Rebecca moved to the Los Angeles area in January 2002. Since moving to LA, she has produced her second track as Aluminum Theory, called "Crunch". Having been played at local clubs in L.A. to her flawless set at the Clevelander Hotel Pool Party in South Beach (WMC 2002), her tracks and her performance are quickly gaining the attention of industry professionals.

In May 2002, Rebecca began working on a new project with long time friend and engineer, Adrian Ordonez. Although she has yet to release her first track from this project, there a two new tracks in the works. Their sound ranges from raw funky tribal to dark techy house/trance. When in Los Angeles, if Rebecca is not in the studio, then she can most likely be found playing at Spundae, Chemistry, or Silent Taco. If you can't find Rebecca in Los Angeles, it's probably because she is fulfilling her duties as Kleen resident in cities such as Portland, Oklahoma City, Asheville, Baltimore, Providence, and Myrtle Beach. If she is not at any of those places, then she is probably out enjoying the fact that she is only 22 years old.

Annalee: How did you get started?

Rebecca Sin: Fate.

What was the 1st record you ever bought?
Rabbit in the moon - Floorida.

What/Where was your 1st gig?
The Exchange Nightclub in downtown Boston.

Where can people find you DJing?
Spundae, Chemistry, CineSpace, anywhere Dubcoast goes!

How did you end up in good ol' Los Angeles?
I went to a film school, so everyone who graduated either went to New York or Los Angeles. I hate the cold weather so New York was not an option. I had never been to LA before, but everyone who visited came back and told me I would love it. I just kind of picked up and came here without knowing what to expect. Even though I donít plan on pursuing a career in film production, moving here was probably the best decision I have ever made.

Do you currently have any residencies?
Big DJ Little Club (used to be We love Tuesdays) in Santa Barbara

Do you currently have any albums out?
Not yet!

Are you in the studio now, do we have anything to look forward to in the near future, maybe some collaboration with someone else?
I have my collaboration with techno producer Steve Eagle called Aluminum Theory. We have completed 2 tracks, and he just relocated from Boston a couple of weeks ago so you can expect much more in the future.

What do you think about all this mainstream techno on the radio these days?
Do you think it is good for the scene or are you 100% against it selling out? That type of "pop-techno" has always been out there. I donít really mind it (as long as I don't have to listen to it) because it breaks the commercial crowd away from hip-hop. It gets them used to dancing without the bump'n'grind.

What type of music do you listen to when you are not spinning?
My CD player in my car was stolen about a week after I moved out here so there is never music in my car. At work I listen to new and upcoming record releases online. When I get home, I go into my room and listen to all my new records over and over again. I donít really feel that it is as important to practice spinning my new records as it is to listen to them. The more you listen to them, the better you will know what to do with them.

Have you ever worked on a Movie Soundtrack?
No. I spent 4 years in college working on films, so Iím trying to get away from that. My roommates have been working on one for a month now and I can tell it is driving them insane. I definitely wouldnít turn down an offer though since it would be great exposure. In fact, all the big producers are practically begging for a soundtrack right now.

What are your thoughts on the scene right now locally?
I think the local scene in LA is great. From what I have seen, a local can often bring more of a crowd than a big name. There is a ton of great local talent in this city like Oliver Twist, Cody Lee, John Wander, Kazell, John Do, Justin Gourley, Larry Kahm (and much more) Its great to see everyone working together. Promoters are starting to realize what they have right in front of them. No need for a flight or a hotel. Eric over at Circus just started a night called Spotlight that showcases up and coming talent in LA. If he can fill all 3 rooms over at Circus with only up-and-comers then that will be a sign that local talent has really taken over.

Do any favorite moments that come to mind? (If moment was during an old scene, do you think this could occur again in the future or is the scene too different now to allow that to happen?)
I was at a rave in a ghetto reggae club in Brooklyn. They shut the party down a couple of hours early because one of the bouncers got in a fight with Keoki. To make up for the early close, they gave everyone free pizza. There is nothing like watching hundreds of ravers leaving a rave at 7am eating a slice of pizza. This is not really my favorite moment, just the one that sticks out in my mind the most. It was a very weird, yet memorable evening. About halfway through the 3 hour drive back to Boston I realized that the girl who searched me at the door never gave me back my driverís license. When I went to fly back to Texas about a month later to get a new license they refused to let me on the plane without the license, even though that was the reason for the trip back home.

In the many places you have performed, which one is your most favorite?
Spundae. Always a great crowd and I love the Allen & Heath mixers at Circus.

How has your creativity changed over the last 10 years? Do you tend to stay with your own styles/ideas or do you allow the mainstream to influence you and your work?
The only way I think that mainstream influences me, is it tells me what NOT to do. I like to offer people something different. Over the past 10 years my creative focus has changed from advertising to graphic design to filmmaking to djing/producing. I am still utilizing some of my skills running the wantickets website, but my main creative focus is my djing.

What is your current Goal as a DJ?
My first goal in LA was to play for Spundae. Now my goal is to become the 1st female artist of Bullitt Bookings. I think I would someday make a perfect addition to their roster.

Where do you see yourself in the next 10 years?
I want to continue playing out regularly. Eventually I want to open a record store. I love listening to music and giving people records I know they will love. Itís also great to turn people on to different types and styles of music, stuff they wouldnít normally play. I would be perfectly happy running a record store during the day, and making music at night. I could probably do that for the rest of my life.

What would you be doing right now if you never bought that 1st record and became a DJ?
I would probably be working my way up in the film industry. Probably reading scripts and answering phones wondering if I would ever get to do what I wanted. I would not be spending all the money I make on records, but I would probably spend a lot of money going out every weekend burning off the frustration of a shitty job.

OK Last question and the cheesiest of all! What is the dopest thing about being a DJ?
Many people think a DJ should conform to the crowd, play what the crowd wants to hear. I love showing them NEW music. Giving them something that they have never heard before. A track sounds different the first time you hear it. I love showing people that new track.

-- written by Annalee Stone

 

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